Here we are, well into September and our club is busy and the sailing is great.  But our club could and should be far busier and far more active with more members enjoying our fantastic Sport of Sailing.

The Sailing Committee is looking at various ways we can improve the way our club moves forward, some of the most important things we are currently looking at are “What are we sailing for?”, “Why does that hard core of sailors keep turning up each week to race against each other ?” and “Why do those members who have boats in the boat park, which have not been sailed for a very long time, not come more often to sail ?”.
 
This Sport of Sailing of ours is a tremendous way of having fun, escaping from the world’s tensions for a little while and completely de-stressing in this tense, stressful world of ours.  Once someone has learned how to handle a sailing dinghy and can “sail”, just pottering around on the lake soon becomes a little stale and boring – you can only enjoy so many circuits of the lake!  The reason we race our dinghies is to improve our skills in Boat Handling, improve our knowledge and ability to extract the most Speed / Power out of our dinghy as we can, in order to move forward up the rankings, hopefully one day to start winning one or more of the Club’s many trophies.  Racing your dinghy, regardless of your personal ability, is an interesting and fulfilling thing to do.  People who are new to the Sport after doing a training Course, are often heard saying things like, “I am nervous about getting in the way on the start line” or, “I don’t want to be a nuisance to others who are serious about their racing” or, “I don’t really know anything about the racing rules”, etc., etc.
 
Please, if those comments ring a bell with you, have a rethink and come down to the club, even if at first it’s just to watch the racing and talk to the members who race regularly – every one of them will be more than happy to talk to you and pass on some useful tips and advice.  Every person who ever raced a sailing dinghy had to start somewhere, everyone will have been nervous on the first few start lines they went up to, most will have had very little understanding of the racing rules when they first started racing.  But through persistence, through turning out and sailing in as many races as they can manage, slowly but surely, they gained the necessary knowledge and skills to allow them to really begin enjoying their chosen sport.  Racing your sailing dinghy is great for your health, both physically and mentally, it is good fun, it is rewarding and challenging at the same time.  Racing a dinghy is great !!!  So please, if you are one of those who feels they don’t know enough, or you have been nervous of getting in the way etc., forget those worries – your sailing club is here to help you get the most out of your chosen sport and there are plenty of members at the club who will be more than willing to guide and advise you. There is some great coaching coming up soon:  “on shore” in the morning “and on the water” in the afternoon.  Dates are: 15.10.16, 22.10.16, 5.11.16, & 12.11.16.  The theory sessions start at 0930; these sessions are being run by some of the club’s top sailors, so come on folks, get down to the club on these dates and you will be in for a treat and better still its FREE !
 
We are also currently looking at our racing programme, i.e. “What are we Racing For?”.  We are looking at all of our Race Series and all of our Individual Events throughout the year, so if you have any thoughts or comments on “What we are Racing for” then please drop the Rear Commodore Sailing an email at chris@padro.org  or have a chat when you are down at the club.  We need to know what the members would like to see in regard to our Racing and events going forwards.
 
So to end this month’s Ramblings: things are looking good at Shustoke Sailing Club, and your Committee is dedicated to improving things even more over the coming months. Come and get your boat cover off and join us – it’s a great place to be, let’s make it even busier. 
 
Regards,

Chris Padro
Rear Commodore Sailing